Tips for Finding the Right Cycling Bicycle

There are lots of reasons to take up cycling. Some folks are having a hard time keeping up with the rising cost of gasoline and maintenance bills, so they choose to ride a bike. Others choose it because riding a bike is better for the environment than travelling in a car or using public transportation.

And there are some who like to cycle simply because it is fun. No matter your reason for choosing to take up cycling, you need to know some important things before you decide on your first bicycle. You will be surprised at how much more there is to a bicycle than just the looks. This article is intended to give you a head's up on what you should keep in mind when it's time to buy your bicycle.

The first thing to ensure is you get a bike that is the right size. For this you must calculate your inseam. To do this, simply run a measuring tape up the inside of your leg from the bottom of your foot to your groin. When you get a bike you should be able to lay both feet flat to the ground if need be. This means that you will be able to stop your bicycle with your feet if the brakes do not work—without having to tilt the bicycle and risk doing harm to it and to yourself.

For road bikes take away 9 inches from the total of your inseam. This is down to the tires a road bike equips. These tires will be thinner and designed for efficiency on concrete roads or pavements. If you are looking for a mountain bike, you will want to subtract about a foot (twelve inches) from your inseam measurement. Mountain bikes have different tires than a road bike. You will find them to be much bigger and designed to handle rocky terrain. You can of course use a mountain bike for road cycling but this isn't supposed to be their primary use.

It is important you allow for room between you and the crossbar. When selecting a bike make sure you move the seat up slightly, to around a few inches above the height of the crossbar. Your feet should still comfortably rest on the ground. Each type of bike will require differing clearance amounts. A good example is a touring Going Here bike, with these bikes you will only need around 1" difference. However for a mountain bike you will need 3" between the crossbar and yourself. There are a lot of criteria to use when deciding which cycling bicycle is right for you. Are you going to be riding your bicycle every day or riding it only when you feel the urge to? What seat height gives you the most comfortable ride? Do you feel more at ease with your feet just above the ground as you sit on the seat, or would you rather that your feet sit flat when you are at rest? These are some of the things you need to consider when choosing your bike.

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